Wednesday, February 24, 2010

cactus yard


we may never be able to afford to buy a house in pasadena. but if we do, we'd love to have a yard that didn't need to be watered every day. this home owner seems to be doing things right!

9 comments:

Cafe Pasadena said...

Maybe you'll have a parsonage instead.

Brenda's Arizona said...

When I think of 'cactus' front yard, I usually think of a sparse one. This is awesome!

pasadenapio said...

When we lived in Palm Springs the front yard was all cactus, including saguaro and ocotillo. Beautiful, especially when they flowered in spring!

ben wideman said...

I feel like it is just such a smart idea when we live in a region that usually doesn't get much rain.

PulledPorker said...

A buddy of mine specializes in landscaping using succulents, cactuses (cacti?), and other plants that are good for arid climate. Some of his work is really nice-looking.

Paula said...

Beautiful. That's some talented landscaper.

Pasadena Adjacent said...

This is a really beautiful garden. Mine is based on what can survive with the least amount of care (except for my nine rose bushes). I hear it's the law in Pasadena to have a a fixed amount of roses per acre.

Petrea said...

Our front yard has grass.
I've been loving the rain because we don't have to water it. I haven't let it die because a) don't want to offend the neighbors and b) can't afford to re-landscape right now.
Backyard used to have grass. But no one can see it so we don't water. Now we have what grows naturally there. Right now it's wonderful, tiny-leafed moss. This summer it'll be a desert (unless we can re-landscape by then).

Kim said...

I have an artist friend during our days in San Francisco that created a garden like this in their front yard, and all the different cactus were placed by color and height to create this magical whole as only an artist could manage. This yard in your shot is fantastic! With the tile roof it looks absolutely perfect. What a labor of love for the owners, and what a lot of work to create it. Those plantings were expensive, no doubt. Now they can enjoy it with minimal maintenance.